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Alexandria After Dark brings together professional archaeologists and historians for informal lectures on topics relating to the rich archaeological heritage of Alexandria and the surrounding area. Cash bar and light refreshments provided.



Char McCargo Bah presents her new book, Alexandria’s Freedmen’s Cemetery: A Legacy of Freedom and recounts the stories of men and women who poured into Alexandria to obtain protection at the beginning of the Civil War, as well as the search for their descendants. Retired City Archaeologist, Fran Bromberg, will then complement the discussion by highlighting the archaeological investigations at the cemetery.

Volunteers, concerned for the well-being of Alexandria, formed the Friendship Fire Company in 1774. Come for an in-depth guided tour of Friendship’s firehouse. Learn about the company’s firefighting procedures and equipment, as well as the different roles the organization played in serving the community. For age 10 and older. $5 for adults, $4 ages 10-17. Reservations are required, as space is limited.
Discover the many roles women played in tavern life! This tour challenges assumptions about a women’s role in the 18th century and how women interacted with the tavern, a place commonly assumed to be just for men. 
Learn about the muggle botanical science that inspired the potions and herbology of J.K. Rowling’s wizarding world on a tour of this 19th century apothecary, and make your own magical sleeping potion! Recommended for ages 8 and up. The one-hour tour begins at 11:00am. Please arrive a few minutes early to check in at the front desk.
If the regular 30 minute tour of the Apothecary Museum just isn’t enough, this is the tour for you! Spend more time touring the museum with an expert guide, including the rarely open basement and 3rd floor of the historic pharmacy. Recommended for ages 18 and up. Tour is 11:00am-12:00pm. Please arrive between 10:45-11:00am as the museum is not open to the public until 1:00pm and the doors will be locked when the tour begins at 11:00am.

Groovy Nate is a children’s entertainer and Wolf Trap Teaching Artist who creates fun and educational shows using exotic musical instruments and ventriloquism. He describes it as Sesame Street meets Parliament/Funkadelic, meshed with The Electric Company, Kraftwerk, and Dub Reggae. The shows encourage children and adults to move, sing, and play creatively with one another, while exposing them to various genres of music. All ages are welcome, but most suitable for children 3 – 8 years old.
Inspired by the musical Hamilton, hear about Washington, Lafayette, Jefferson, Madison, and Burr who all came to the tavern and delve into the issues they faced and how their choices impacted local citizens.

Girls working on the It's Your Story--Tell It: Media journey evaluate media through a fresh lense as they examine historic advertising and products. The highlight of this three hour event (6-9 p.m.) is working as a team to film a short Public Service Announcement, pulling together what they've learned about persuasion, ethics, and stereotypes. The evening wraps up with girls reflecting on how they engage with media and writing Media Pledges.

This is not a drop-off event. Even for individual girls at least one adult must accompany. All adults must purchase tickets and troops need to meet the minimum chaperone requirements as outlined by the Girl Scout Safety Wise guidelines, with a minimum of two adults per troop for groups of 8 or more and one adult for smaller groups or individuals. Please, no tag-alongs.

Troop leaders will receive an information packet approximately one month prior to the event. After the event, troop leaders will receive a drop-box link via email to their troop's PSA video.

Activity patch is available for purchase in gift shop at the end of the event. Troop leaders are responsible for buying the Girl Scout award separately.

All sales are final.
Bring your little learners to the Alexandria Black History Museum for cultural stories and creative craft activities that introduce world history and folklore. Story time will take place every first Saturday of the month at 11 a.m. Explore the museum exhibits afterwards to learn about local black history. All ages are welcome, but most suitable for children 3-6 years old.
Join us for our "Fighting Fire: Historic Fires in Alexandria" walking tour. A big fire can impact an entire community. Visit the sites of especially significant fires that occurred in 1871, 1873, 1897 and 1909, and learn about the technology employed to fight these fires. For age 10 and older. $6 for adults, $4 ages 10-17. Reservations are required, as space is limited.
In preparation for the Celestial Ball on May 4, learn 18th-century English Country Dancing from expert dance instructors. Those not familiar with this style of dancing should complete at least one full class to become accustomed to the figures and language for the ball.
In preparation for the Celestial Ball on May 4, learn 18th-century English Country Dancing from expert dance instructors. Those not familiar with this style of dancing should complete at least one full class to become accustomed to the figures and language for the ball.

Classes are April 18, 25, and May 2.
In preparation for the Celestial Ball on May 4, learn 18th-century English Country Dancing from expert dance instructors. Those not familiar with this style of dancing should complete at least one full class to become accustomed to the figures and language for the ball.
Carefully curated, Becoming American is a selection of documentaries designed to engage and enlighten audiences, representing a selection of diverse immigration experiences drawn from both the past and present. Each of the 6 sessions is moderated by a scholar who will also facilitate discussion after the viewing. This event is free, however pre-registration is required. Participants are encouraged to attend as many as they can. Light refreshments will be available. This program is designed for adults, though high school students are welcome to attend with an adult. This series is a project of City Lore in collaboration with the Immigration and Ethnic History Society and the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience. Becoming American has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Sessions are March 16, March 30, April 13, April 27, May 11, and May 18.



April 27: Help Wanted? Immigration and Work ~ Looks at the economic side of immigration, chronicling the essential part immigrant labor has played in building America, as well as the conflicted relationship American workers have had with immigrants. [Film: Destination America, Episode 1, The Golden Door.]

This special bus tour begins at Mount Vernon with a special viewing of Mount Vernon’s new exhibition, Lives Bound Together, on slavery at George Washington’s plantation. The tour will be conducted by exhibit curators. Afterwards, visitors will walk to Mount Vernon’s Slave Cemetery for a site talk by archeologists, followed by a lunchtime lecture (box lunch provided). After lunch, guests will board a bus to Alexandria and visit Freedom House Museum, once part of the headquarters for the largest domestic slave trading firm in the United States, and then on to Alexandria’s Contraband and Freedmen Cemetery Memorial, the burial ground for over 1700 contrabands (escaped slaves). The tour will conclude at Mount Vernon at 4 p.m. The tour will go rain or shine and has extended periods of walking over uneven terrain. Shuttle transport between sites at Mount Vernon is available for those with mobility concerns. Please indicate if you need accommodation on the tour.



Under Additional Requirements, please note if you will need a shuttle accommodation at Mount Vernon and your lunch selection (1. Ham & Swiss with honey mustard 2. Home-style chicken salad 3. Smoked Turkey Wrap - with pepper jack cheese, lettuce and chipotle mayonnaise 4. Roasted Vegetables and Red Pepper Hummus Wrap - with fresh spinach (vegan)

Learn about some of the fascinating programs and performances from The Lyceum’s first twenty years. Science was a popular topic for lectures, demonstrations, and exhibits at Lyceum Hall, as it was known in the 1840s and 50s – some of them featuring legitimate academic programs and others featuring the latest pseudoscience crazes of the day. Performers ranged from the scandalous Dionysius Lardner, who lectured at Lyceum Hall on astronomy, to the display of the “Feejee” Mermaid, a hoax made famous by the father of humbug P.T. Barnum. Jim Holloway, facilities coordinator at the Alexandria History Museum at The Lyceum shares his research on the wide variety of science-based entertainments enjoyed by Alexandrians in the two decades before the Civil War. Doors open at 7 p.m., lecture begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10.
In preparation for the Celestial Ball on May 4, learn 18th-century English Country Dancing from expert dance instructors. Those not familiar with this style of dancing should complete at least one full class to become accustomed to the figures and language for the ball.
Kick off Preservation Month with a special access tour of the Murray-Dick-Fawcett House and Happy Hour! Enjoy touring this 18th-century house, now owned and operated by the City of Alexandria, and stop by the cash bar in the garden to catch up with other local preservationists. Rain Location: The Lyceum.
Advanced registration recommended.
Long ago in a time far far away… join us on May the 4th for a star-studded ball. Enjoy live music, English Country dancing and a seasonal dessert collation. Last quarter of the 18th century costume optional; “after-five” attire encouraged. Advanced registration is required, space is limited.

Those not familiar with this style of dancing should complete at least one full class to become accustomed to the figures and language for the ball.
Explore the 18th century buildings, including spaces rarely opened to the public, and understand how the buildings have changed over time. Wear comfortable shoes and bring your camera!



Alexandria After Dark brings together professional archaeologists and historians for informal lectures on topics relating to the rich archaeological heritage of Alexandria and the surrounding area. Cash bar and light refreshments provided.



Lab Manager Kevin Bradley introduces the Alexandria Veterans Curation Program (VCP) and its unique mission to serve military veterans and rehabilitate at-risk United States Army Corps of Engineers archaeological collections. The preservation currently being performed on material remains from the Civil War prison camp at Fort Delaware will also be highlighted.

Carefully curated, Becoming American is a selection of documentaries designed to engage and enlighten audiences, representing a selection of diverse immigration experiences drawn from both the past and present. Each of the 6 sessions is moderated by a scholar who will also facilitate discussion after the viewing. This event is free, however pre-registration is required. Participants are encouraged to attend as many as they can. Light refreshments will be available. This program is designed for adults, though high school students are welcome to attend with an adult. This series is a project of City Lore in collaboration with the Immigration and Ethnic History Society and the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience. Becoming American has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Sessions are March 16, March 30, April 13, April 27, May 11, and May 18.



May 11: Family and Community ~ Explores how family ties and community institutions have played an essential role in successful migration and adaptation to American life. [Film: My American Girls.]

Join us for our "We’ve Been Burned: Alexandria Firefighters During the Civil War" walking tour. When Virginia joined the Confederacy, Union troops occupied Alexandria and most municipal functions were assumed by the U.S. Army. This walking tour explores firefighting during the occupation. How were volunteer fire companies treated by Federal authorities? Participants visit sites of four of the five fire houses and learn what happened if there was a fire. For age 10 and older. $6 for adults, $4 ages 10-17. Reservations are required, as space is limited.
Enjoy an evening of history and cocktails at Historic Congressional Cemetery. On the 175th anniversary of John Gadsby’s internment at his final resting place, tour the newly restored Gadsby vault, learn more about this historic cemetery, and sip inspired cocktails created by local mixologist, Branden Beasley. Price includes one drink ticket and light hors d’oeuvres. Street Parking at Congressional is available.
Carefully curated, Becoming American is a selection of documentaries designed to engage and enlighten audiences, representing a selection of diverse immigration experiences drawn from both the past and present. Each of the 6 sessions is moderated by a scholar who will also facilitate discussion after the viewing. This event is free, however pre-registration is required. Participants are encouraged to attend as many as they can. Light refreshments will be available. This program is designed for adults, though high school students are welcome to attend with an adult. This series is a project of City Lore in collaboration with the Immigration and Ethnic History Society and the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience. Becoming American has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Sessions are March 16, March 30, April 13, April 27, May 11, and May 18.



May 18: Immigration and Popular Culture ~ Looks at the ways the media and popular culture have historically taught newcomers how to “be American,” and how the rich contributions of different immigrant groups have transformed American culture and art. [Film: The Search for General Tso.]

Tom Mayes, Vice President and Senior Counsel at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, discusses his new book Why Old Places Matter. Although people often feel very deeply about the old places of their lives, they often don’t have the words to express why. Tom’s book creates this narrative through evocative words and beautiful imagery. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for the 7 p.m. lecture. Reception and book signing to follow. Books will be available for puchase on-site.
Experience a program like the ones Alexandrians enjoyed in the 1840s and 1850s! David Keltz, renowned for his portrayal of Edgar Allan Poe, returns to the Alexandria History Museum at The Lyceum to portray phrenologist Nelson Sizer. Phrenology, the 19th-century pseudoscience in which practitioners measured and felt the ridges and bumps on people’s heads to determine their personality and prospects, was quite popular though also controversial in the 19th century. On May 29, 1841, Mr. Sizer and his partner P. L. Buell lectured at Lyceum Hall in Alexandria on "Courtship and Marriage" as part of a series of lectures and demonstrations presented in April and May of that year. The lectures included information about how to understand and apply the principals of phrenology along with readings of the heads of people in the audience. David Keltz as Mr. Sizer will present the principals of phrenology applicable to courtship and marriage based on 19th-century writings and will provide readings to willing participants. 21 and over. $15 – cash bar. Doors open at 7 p.m., program begins at 7:30 p.m.
Alexandria After Dark brings together professional archaeologists and historians for informal lectures on topics relating to the rich archaeological heritage of Alexandria and the surrounding area. Cash bar and light refreshments provided.



City of Alexandria Archaeologist Benjamin Skolnik presents a new take on the history of the city as told through fifteen seldom-seen maps. In this Archaeology After Dark, Alexandria history is combined with the history of cartography to show the many ways people, including City Archaeologists, make and use maps.

Archaeology Summer Camp provides an opportunity for 12-15 year-olds to work on a real archaeological dig. Campers spend a week helping Alexandria’s City archaeologists excavate a real site while learning professional excavating, recording, and artifact processing methods. Uncover Alexandria’s buried past while protecting the City’s valuable historic resources. Summer camp applications can be found online at www.alexandriava.gov/Archaeology. Registration is limited, and all applications are processed on a first come, first served basis. You must submit both an application and payment for your spot to be held. Refunds cannot be made after June 1, 2019.